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Antique Octagonal Tea Caddy inlaid in wood and decorated with hand coloured prints circa 1790

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Description: Octagonal Tea Caddy inlaid in wood and decorated with hand coloured prints circa 1790
Ref: 748TC
http://hygra.com/box/748TC 

This exceptional caddy retains its original distinctive varnish which protects the prints. The varnish which has clouded over the years should not be removed as it is a very rare survivor of the type of varnish made by the individual cabinet maker and as such a precious record of such work. The caddy is attributable to Joseph Knight, a Tunbridge Ware Maker, of renown. A caddy with similar distinctive inlay and crossbandings featured in Dr Brian Austenís book on Tunbridge ware bears Joseph Knight's label and claims royal patronage.
The caddy combines neoclassical elements with 18th century romanticism. This is most unusual. The neoclassical forms and inlays were often combined with prints of neoclassical themes, albeit the 18th and early 19th century re-workings of the designs. The caddy is veneered in harewood and each panel is framed by an array of stringings in light and dark woods and a fine subtle herringbone cross-banding. This incredibly complex work looks deceptively simple. The front features a symmetrically draped swag of myrtle leaves bracketing a print of two very young people, a boy and a girl. The print is delineated by an inlay of boxwood alternating with thinner darker lines.
The sides continue the symmetrical neoclassical design with a central oval of burr yew. The narrower sides are inlaid with an abstraction of classical pillars.
The back continues the theme with an elongated oval in keeping with the longer side.
The other side.
The top has two ovals with prints which in addition to the fine line delineation are also framed with stylised myrtle leaves. The whole top is again framed with stringings and cross-banding. The prints are of children in charming settings, the left featuring a boy giving a girl a rose, the right two boys gathering nuts in a hat.
The lids continue the oval and banded designs harmonising with the exterior of the caddy.
Inside the containers there is evidence of the original lead and of later metallic paper (probably Victorian).
The underside with the original cloth.

Origin: UK;  Circa: 1790; Materials: .

Size: 21 cm wide by 12  cm by 12.5 cm:  8.3 inches wide by  4.7 inches by  4.9  inches.

Condition: good original overall retaining its 18th C varnish; working lock and key; see images

Request current  list of available sewing boxes with prices.
Request current  list of available writing boxes with prices.

Request current  list of available jewelry boxes with prices.

Request current  list of available tea caddies with prices.

boxes@hygra.com

 

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The varnish which has clouded over the years should not be removed as it is a very rare survivor of the type of varnish made by the individual cabinet maker and as such a precious record of such work. The caddy is attributable to Joseph Knight, a Tunbridge Ware Maker, of renown. 

A caddy with similar distinctive inlay and crossbandings featured in Dr Brian Austenís book on Tunbridge ware bears Joseph Knight's label and claims royal patronage.


The caddy combines neoclassical elements with 18th century romanticism. This is most unusual. The neoclassical forms and inlays were often combined with prints of neoclassical themes, albeit the 18th and early 19th century re-workings of the designs. 

The caddy is veneered in harewood and each panel is framed by an array of stringings in light and dark woods and a fine subtle herringbone cross-banding.

 This incredibly complex work looks deceptively simple. The front features a symmetrically draped swag of myrtle leaves bracketing a print of two very young people, a boy and a girl. The print is delineated by an inlay of boxwood alternating with thinner darker lines.

Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

Enlarge Picture

The sides continue the symmetrical neoclassical design with a central oval of burr yew. The narrower sides are inlaid with an abstraction of classical pillars.

 

 The back continues the theme with an elongated oval of burr yew in keeping with the longer side.

Enlarge Picture

Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

Enlarge Picture

 

Enlarge Picture

The top has two ovals with prints which in addition to the fine line delineation are also framed with stylised myrtle leaves. The whole top is again framed with stringings and cross-banding. The prints are of children in charming settings, the left featuring a boy giving a girl a rose, the right two boys gathering nuts in a hat.

Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

Enlarge Picture

The lids continue the oval and banded designs harmonising with the exterior of the caddy.

 

Inside the containers there is evidence of the original lead and of later metallic paper (probably Victorian).
Enlarge Picture

 

Enlarge Picture

The underside with the original cloth.

Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

All text and images and linked images are © 1999-2014 Antigone Clarke and Joseph O'Kelly. If you require any further information on permitted use, or a licence to republish any material, email us at copyright@hygra.com